Karima Khondakar

Tue Jun 16 2020 04:00:00 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time)

43998KKh

“Volunteering makes me happy because I know I’m making a good difference in people's lives. When I heard about BDP, I excitedly joined right away. One specific goal that I have for BDP is making sure everyone has access to proper healthcare, no matter their situation.

I recently lost my young uncle, Sunny Munshi, due to lack of proper healthcare in Bangladesh. Each doctor gave a different diagnosis for his throat issue. My relatives were unaware of his actual condition. They just wanted to make him feel better. He went through excruciating pain during treatment. He couldn’t eat or sleep properly. There were nights he just cried because he wanted to sleep but physically couldn't. He kept everything to himself instead of expressing it to his siblings or parents because he didn't want them to suffer like him. After his death, his mom poured her feelings out when we talked to her. She understood what her child went through, even if he didn’t tell her. She already knew.

His last medical report said his tonsils swelled to the point where the prescribed medicines weren't helping. All the different medications interacted with one another and had different side effects occur at once. The hospitals in Bangladesh aren’t reliable. Many doctors tell you to buy more medicine or give the wrong treatments. They don't provide medical care unless they receive a cash payment before the treatment begins. They profit from giving people unnecessary tests because it means patients have to come back for test results and pay for another visit. There have been cases of people acting like doctors and giving advice to get money from people who are desperate to treat their family members. InshaAllah when I become a physician, I will create a hospital in Bangladesh and limit the problems that people endure when getting treated. I want to bring a smile on everyone’s faces and help them to the best of my ability. I’m trying to make these types of injustices known to the public, to raise awareness and prevent instances like my uncle’s from occurring.”